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Vintage Disneyland PeopleMover cars sell for $471,500

A shot of Disneyland's PeopleMover taken June 29, 1967 reads,
A shot of Disneyland's PeopleMover taken June 29, 1967 reads, "One of Disneyland's new attractions, the PeopleMover, is introduced in the new $22 million Tomorrowland. System consists of 62 four-car trains propelled on an elevated 'glideway' at speeds up to seven miles an hour. One train is shown." The PeopleMover operated from July 2, 1967 to August 21, 1995.
Los Angeles Public Library Photo Collection

A pair of cars from Disneyland's long-running PeopleMover has sold at a Los Angeles auction for $471,500.

Officially part of Tomorrowland, the PeopleMover was an elevated tram that took visitors on a slow moving ride through the park. It carried its first passengers in 1967 and ran until 1995.

The auction held over the weekend by Van Eaton Galleries included hundreds of items of Disneyland memorabilia.

Mike Van Eaton tells KPCC that the two cars, measuring 18 feet long and 6.5 feet tall, formed the largest lot of the auction.

"We almost did not accept it as we could not figure out how to get it into our building," he says.

Fortunately, the previous owner built a custom trailer that is included with the cars.

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Although the seller and the buyer have both remained anonymous, Van Eaton reveals that the previous owner purchased the cars from Disney and spent three years restoring them to working order.

Other items at the auction included the marquee sign for the Golden Horseshoe Revue, which sold for $48,875, and an original poster for the Rocket to the Moon attraction, which fetched $28,175.

Bids came from around the world. The PeopleMover was the most expensive item.

"Many people that came to the exhibition mentioned that the PeopleMover was one of their favorite rides at Disneyland," Van Eaton says. "Many people have asked Disney to bring the ride back. The track is still there. I think this buyer wanted a little piece of the history of the park."

The image used with this story came from the Los Angeles Public Library Photo Collection.

This story has been updated.