Crime & Justice

Anaheim police arrest 3 after anonymous threats on Ogle app

Anaheim police say they arrested Miguel Meza, left, and Johnny Aguilar, right, on March 26 in connection with threats posted online against Loara High School in Anaheim. Police said officers found two handguns in the car the men were traveling in.
Anaheim police say they arrested Miguel Meza, left, and Johnny Aguilar, right, on March 26 in connection with threats posted online against Loara High School in Anaheim. Police said officers found two handguns in the car the men were traveling in.

Anaheim police say they have arrested two men and a juvenile male suspected of posting anonymous threats against Loara High School on the social media app Ogle last Friday.

Police arrested a 15-year-old 10th grade Loara student suspected of posting one of the threats, along with 18-year-old Loara alumnus Miguel Meza and 23-year-old Johnny Aguilar, according to an Anaheim police press release.

Meza was arrested after a traffic stop over the weekend and police officers found two loaded guns in the car he was driving, police said. Aguilar, who also in the vehicle, was taken into custody on a probation violation, police said. 

Ogle, the app the three are alleged to have used for the threats, is a "campus feed" where students can anonymously post photos, videos and text so everyone at a selected school can see it.

The app allows users to comment on and like each others' posts, participate in private or group chats, and send anonymous photos in chats for a limited number of seconds. When the app is downloaded, it automatically searches the geographic area for local schools' feeds.

When KPCC checked the Loara High School feed on Ogle, it had messages that included, "Thoughts on so-in-so," "STFU and send nudes" and "Online bullies are the worst!" 

“It is just solely anonymous, it doesn’t require any kind of a login," Anaheim police Sgt. Daron Wyatt told KPCC. "It’s just downloaded and then people can post. So the anonymity is what causes the great challenges to us."

The Loara High threats weren't the only threats posted against a high school on Ogle this past weekend. El Modena High School in the city of Orange amped up security Monday after threats of a shooting were posted on the app, and earlier this month similar threats were made using Ogle against schools in the Monterey Unified School District in Northern California.

A statement from an Ogle spokesman said that the company is working to help authorities during investigations. 

"Given recent events, we are reaching out to school districts and seeking help from experts to navigate this space quickly and responsibly," the Ogle statement said.

Wyatt said the Loara High investigation will be turned over to the Orange County District Attorney's office.