Crime & Justice

Family of new LAPD officer: 'In any job, there's danger'

LAPD Sgt. Emada Tingirides mixes more traditional police work with building relationships in the Nickerson Gardens Housing Project in Watts.
LAPD Sgt. Emada Tingirides mixes more traditional police work with building relationships in the Nickerson Gardens Housing Project in Watts.
Frank Stoltze

The mood was proud yet somber as the Los Angeles Police Department welcomed a new group of officers onto the force on Friday morning.

The killing of five Dallas police officers on Thursday night weighed on the minds of many people who came to see their family members and friends graduate from the Police Academy.

"That does make me nervous," said Dave Gonzalez, whose nephew Angel Leon was among the graduates. "Once he's going to be out in the street, yes, I'm going to be extremely nervous."

Other were stoic about the potential risk to their loved ones.

"In any job, there's danger," said Danielle Slournoy, whose niece will soon hit L.A.'s streets as an officer. "I just hope and pray that nothing ever happens. But like I said, it comes with any job. You could be in an office and someone will lose it. So it doesn't really matter."

In his remarks at the graduation ceremony, LAPD Chief Charlie Beck mentioned that all three of his children work in law enforcement and he worries about them every day. But he said he also worried about them every day as children and will continue to worry about them when they retire.

Beck closed his speech on a positive note: "I'll end this as I end every one of my graduation speeches, even though this one is vastly different, with a promise to your family and friends: That while your loved ones are protecting and serving the people of L.A., I promise you I will protect and serve them."

Attendees had earlier observed a moment of silence for the five Dallas police officers killed in the line of duty.