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Community involvement moves 'Hoover Triangle' revamp toward reality

Members of the University Park community, people from USC's School of Architecture, the Los Angeles Bureau of Street Services, and Councilman Gil Cedillo, and a representative from the Housing and Community Investment Department participate in a ground-breaking ceremony for the Hoover Triangle project on Sept. 8, 2016.
Members of the University Park community, people from USC's School of Architecture, the Los Angeles Bureau of Street Services, and Councilman Gil Cedillo, and a representative from the Housing and Community Investment Department participate in a ground-breaking ceremony for the Hoover Triangle project on Sept. 8, 2016.
Office of Councilman Gil Cedillo

An unappealing triangle of land bordered by Hoover and 23rd streets and South Union Avenue in the University Park neighborhood will become a landscaped plaza with amenities for waiting bus riders and area residents.

Community members involved in the planning of the revamped Hoover Triangle broke ground for the project during a ceremony Thursday morning. 

The project will include improved lighting at the bus stops and within the plaza, a multi-use performance area, benches, trash receptacles, drought tolerant landscaping, trees along the street and within the plaza, new sidewalks and curb ramps, tables and seating for both adults and children, bike racks, and colored concrete paving.

“These are the types of projects we love to do in our district,” said Los Angeles City Councilman Gil Cedillo. “The seed was planted by community members, and our staff went above and beyond to completely repurpose what is now a dirt field. The design of the triangle was not only created with the community in mind, it was designed by them. It’s the type of project that, when completed, we’ll point to and say ‘we’ did that."

The project evolved from residents and businesses advocating for repairs to the triangle's irrigation system and for lighting and benches for public transit riders.

 

Planning for the project began in 2014, with a series of community meetings organized by Cedillo's office and the North Area Neighborhood Development Council, and design workshops conducted by a student team from USC’s School of Architecture.

Improvements to the triangle, which has about $575,000 in funding, is expected to be completed by July 2017.

Hoover Triangle drawings