Business & Economy

Anaheim at odds with Angels over development project

General view of the exterior main entrance of Angel Stadium of Anaheim prior to the game between the Baltimore Orioles and the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim on Aug. 21, 2011.
General view of the exterior main entrance of Angel Stadium of Anaheim prior to the game between the Baltimore Orioles and the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim on Aug. 21, 2011.
Jeff Golden/Getty Images

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The Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim have had a rough season -- living in the cellar of the division for the past four months, and now, with just a week left in their forgettable season, they may have a huge project as a neighbor that would effectively nix their own development plans for the area.
 
That could affect the Angels baseball team’s willingness to stay in Anaheim. The city of Anaheim already decided not to pay for renovations to Angel Stadium, and that contributed to the team’s search for a new home. It looked at and rejected a possible move to Tustin.
 
If it stays in Anaheim, the team will need to make its own renovations, so team officials wanted to generate cash for those upgrades through a development of their own.
 
Marie Garvey, spokesperson for the Angels, says the team isn’t against nearby developments in general, but they are concerned about the particulars of this one.
 
The plan for the LT Global project in the Platinum Triangle includes a 30-story-tall condo tower that would dwarf the big red A of Angel Stadium, along with 21 restaurants, 200 hotel rooms and 77,000 square feet of office space.
 
Garvey says a project that size needs more public input, a full environmental impact report – and a little more say-so from the Angels.
 
“This project was originally analyzed for 878 residential units,” she said. “So it’s a massive change to the project.”
 
But Anaheim mayor Tom Tait says due diligence has been done.
 
“The city had done a comprehensive EIR anticipating a project like that years ago,” he said. “The EIR has been done.” 
 
From his point of view, Anaheim can’t afford not to approve it.
 
“This project represents half a billion dollars of new construction, a ton of jobs, a lot of tax revenue to the city — and creates an excitement that’s needed in that area,” Tait said.