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Laurel Canyon reopens during a respite before more rains

This image made from video provided by KABC-TV shows a slab of concrete that broke away from a home and slid down a rain-soaked hillside in Los Angeles' Hollywood Hills neighborhood Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2016. Some mud and debris fell as far as Laurel Canyon Boulevard below the home, causing the road to be closed. (KABC-TV via AP)
This image made from video provided by KABC-TV shows a slab of concrete that broke away from a home and slid down a rain-soaked hillside in Los Angeles' Hollywood Hills neighborhood Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2016. Some mud and debris fell as far as Laurel Canyon Boulevard below the home, causing the road to be closed. (KABC-TV via AP)
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If you drive between the San Fernando Valley and Los Angeles' westside, you’ll be glad to know that Laurel Canyon Boulevard has been reopened after almost a week-long closure

But the reopening comes as forecasters say more rains are coming to the area and memories of the massive traffic snarl that spun out of the closing are still fresh.

Recent rains caused a mudslide near the 8100 block of West Gould Avenue and part of a home's patio spilled onto Laurel Canyon on Wednesday. Crews worked to clear the debris and the street was opened over the weekend to southbound traffic.

Northbound traffic is still being detoured for a section between Kirkwood and Mount Olympus. There was no estimate from the city Tuesday on the duration of the detour.

C:\Users\32246\Desktop\Laurel Cyn Closure Plan 2 Model (1)
C:\Users\32246\Desktop\Laurel Cyn Closure Plan 2 Model (1)

Although traffic is flowing, drivers should still expect delays, according to L.A. Department of Transportation spokesman Bruce Gillman. He said any closure of the canyon roads has a ripple effect.

"[It's] very important that the San Fernando Valley and the westside have these connections; they’re vibrant and busy neighborhoods," he said. "So any bottlenecks have an impact on adjacent streets as well."

The L.A. Department of Public Works is assessing other potential trouble spots for mudslides as several more days of rain are in the forecast.

Crews will continue to work on stabilizing the hillside and keeping it from siding, according to updates posted on the L.A. Emergency Management Department website. More fencing and tarps will be installed in anticipation of the rains later this week.

LAPD and traffic control officers from the L.A Department of Transportation have been enforcing traffic flow and drivers can expect to continue to see them on scene. Laurel Canyon remains closed to trucks over 6,000 pounds.