Politics

As LA vote count continues, incumbent Cedillo's lead narrows

(File photo) Los Angeles City Councilman Gil Cedillo could face a run off in May. The latest vote count shows him slightly below the 50 percent plus one vote margin needed to win the race outright.
(File photo) Los Angeles City Councilman Gil Cedillo could face a run off in May. The latest vote count shows him slightly below the 50 percent plus one vote margin needed to win the race outright.
Grant Slater/KPCC

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Los Angeles County officials' updated election results Tuesday show that City Council member Gil Cedillo's margin of support is slipping and that he may face a runoff. 

About 5,000 votes were added to the count in that race, and the updated results now show Cedillo at 49.51 percent support. Cedillo's leading challenger, Joe Bray-Ali, stands at 38.14 percent.

Two other candidates, Giovany Hernandez and Jesse Rosas, trailed at 8.23 percent and 4.12 percent respectively.

Cedillo is the only Los Angeles City Council incumbent who appears to be at risk for a run-off election. He's had a long career in politics — he spent 14 years in the state legislature before becoming a City Council member for northeast and central Los Angeles back in 2013.

Cedillo was one of two council members not to get the Los Angeles Times endorsement for another term.

Earlier vote counts had shown him squeaking above the margin needed to win the race outright. Cedillo needs to reach 50 percent plus one vote to avoid a runoff. If that doesn't happen, voters will decide between the top two finishers during the May 16 general election. 

Measure H, the county sales tax measure aimed at boosting funds for the homeless, is also a close contest. But the updated results show its margin of support is growing. Voters are backing it 68.72 percent to 31.28, an uptick from earlier results. It needs 2/3 support to pass. 

One open seat, which represents District 7 in the San Fernando Valley, will also have a run-off. Currently, candidates Monica Rodriguez and Karo Torossian are in the top two spots. But Torossian is only about 400 votes ahead of the third place candidate Mónica Ratliff.

Los Angeles County election officials still have about 55,000 ballots to count overall. The next vote count update is scheduled for Friday.