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Paralympian medalist to ride in Culver City-Venice CicLAvia to highlight accessibility issues

FILE PHOTO: Cyclists ride the open streets in downtown Los Angeles on Sunday, Oct. 18, 2015. Six miles of streets in and around downtown Los Angeles were closed to motor vehicles as the CicLAvia festival opened the car-free lanes to cyclists, skaters and pedestrians.
FILE PHOTO: Cyclists ride the open streets in downtown Los Angeles on Sunday, Oct. 18, 2015. Six miles of streets in and around downtown Los Angeles were closed to motor vehicles as the CicLAvia festival opened the car-free lanes to cyclists, skaters and pedestrians.
Richard Vogel/AP

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CicLAvia, the popular open streets event, heads to Culver City and Venice this Sunday with a special cause to highlight.

Six miles of city streets will be shut to car traffic and open to bikers, skaters, all other manner of non-motor vehicle users.

For this 20th CicLAvia, organizers are focusing on making the event more accessible for those with disabilities.

There will be added Americans with Disabilities Act-compliant bathrooms at event hubs and more volunteers to lend a hand to those who may need additional assistance.

Organizers have also teamed with the LA2024 Olympic exploratory committee and its vice chair, Candace Cable, a nine-time Paralympian in wheelchair racing. She stressed you don’t need a bike to take part in CicLAvia.

"It really breaks down all the barriers by opening up the street," she said. "I’m gonna be rolling around in my everyday chair there. That’s why it’s really important for transportation and our streets and our sidewalks to be very accessible."

Sunday's event will run along Washington and Venice Boulevards from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

Ciclavia