Here are the best eclipse moments across Southern California

168427 full
168427 full

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P11y8N22Rq0

Americans with telescopes, cameras and protective glasses staked out viewing spots along a narrow corridor from Oregon to South Carolina to watch the moon blot out the midday sun Monday in what promised to be the most observed and photographed eclipse in history.

Eclipse-watchers everywhere fretted about the weather and hoped for clear skies for the first total solar eclipse to sweep coast-to-coast across the U.S. in practically a century.

Here in L.A., we got another sunny day, so people were able to see the eclipse just fine. 

At Griffith Observatory, thousands gathered to peer through telescopes and experience the celestial event together.

The Observatory set-up different viewers of the eclipse for those without glasses. This one trains a set of binoculars onto a sheet of paper
The Observatory set-up different viewers of the eclipse for those without glasses. This one trains a set of binoculars onto a sheet of paper Leo Duran/KPCC

Of course, capturing the moment is nearly as important as the experience itself. We saw a few friends collaborating to snag that perfect shot.

Iuliana Diaconescu, Gabriela Quiroz, and Jacqui Inouye work together to get the right pic of the eclipse on their DSLR camera
Iuliana Diaconescu, Gabriela Quiroz, and Jacqui Inouye work together to get the right pic of the eclipse on their DSLR camera Leo Duran/KPCC

If you couldn't get your hands on a pair of shades for the eclipse, we may have found one of the culprits of the glasses shortage.  https://twitter.com/MikeRoe/status/899646592243957760

One of the coolest parts of the eclipse isn't just seeing the sun being covered up — it's the way it changes the light all around you. The sun's light dimmed and temperatures cooled as the moon slid in front of the sun.

This might have been the moon's shining moment, but here in SoCal the sun still reigned. 

 

Tiny mirror image reflection of eclipse in the solarflare. #eclipse2017 #eclipseLA

A post shared by Carrie Now Casting (@carrie.now.casting) on

 

This L.A.-based viewer gave the shirt off their back to see the eclipse. 

 

Look closely at all the tiny eclipses in the shadow of her shirt! #LAeclipse Thanks @kpcc for the pin hole camera!

A post shared by Emily Lair (@emilyfromgimli) on

 

Some found it absolutely jaw-dropping. 

 

Eclipse madness at Cal Tech! #laeclipse #eclipse #abc7news #totaleclipse #pasadena #lookup #10:21 #kpcc #nbc #nbcnews #cnn

A post shared by Jeanette Aguilar▪️ California (@riotandahalf) on

 

Others, in classic L.A. fashion, got a little glam. 

 

Ryan Gosling and Emma stone would have had a bit of a hard time dancing through the Griffith Observatory today. 

https://twitter.com/Adam_Levy/status/899684989314383872

 

Local trees didn't want to be (sigh) leaf-t out of the fun.

 

The eclipse got its groove on for this OC-based viewer. 

https://twitter.com/natealcantara/status/899692488260165636

California wasn't one of the 11 states in the path of total darkness, but NASA live-streamed the eclipse for four and a half hours, beginning at 8:45 a.m.

KPCC's Mike Roe traveled from Southern California to Madras, Oregon to witness the full eclipse. He braved the masses, the terrible traffic and stinky Porta Potties, but said seeing the total eclipse was "breathtaking." 

"It was definitely worth it. It's an experience that puts the power of science right before your eyes," said Roe, a digital producer. "It's something that's so rare to get a chance to see."

He added that he was already making plans to see the the next one in 2024.

NPR tracked the path of today's eclipse, which you can check out below:


 

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