Group 9 Created with Sketch. Group 13 Created with Sketch. Pause Created with Sketch. Combined Shape Created with Sketch. Group 12 Created with Sketch. Group 12 Created with Sketch. Shape Created with Sketch. Group 10 Created with Sketch. Shape Created with Sketch. Fill 15 Copy Created with Sketch. Shape Created with Sketch. Group 13 Created with Sketch. Group 16 Created with Sketch. Group 3 Created with Sketch. Group 13 Created with Sketch. Group 16 Created with Sketch. Group 18 Created with Sketch. Group 19 Created with Sketch. Group 21 Created with Sketch. Group 22 Created with Sketch.
|

How to get notified about fire evacuations in your area

The Thomas Fire broke out Monday near Santa Paula and grew to more than 48 square miles in the hours that followed, burning dozens of homes. Thousands of people were told to evacuate. Ventura County Fire Department

Updated: 4:05 pm 

The California Office of Emergency Services is now sending emergency alerts through what's known as the Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) system. In order to get these alerts, you must have Emergency Alerts turned on in your phone's settings. 

There is no centralized alert system in Southern California to notify residents about fire evacuation orders.

Rather, each county in the region – Los Angeles, Orange, Ventura, San Bernardino and Riverside – has its own text alert system.

Here’s a breakdown of some of those systems, and how to opt in.

Ventura County 

Ventura County's emergency alert system is called VC Alert.  You can sign up here.

VC Alert uses 911 databases from telephone companies, so most land lines will already be in the system. 

Here are some additional resources for staying up-to-date with mandatory evacuations, shelters, road closures and more:

Los Angeles County 

You can sign up for a system called Alert L.A. County, which the county says "is used to contact county residents and businesses via recorded phone messages, text messages or e-mail messages in case of emergency." You can sign up here.

The L.A. County Fire Department also posts regular updates on its Twitter account

The City of L.A. also has a mass notification system, NotifyLA. You can sign up here, or text READY to 888-777.

The Los Angeles Fire Department also puts regular updates on its Twitter account

Santa Barbara County 

You can sign up for Santa Barbara County's emergency alert system here

You can also follow Santa Barbara County's Office of Emergency Management on Twitter

Orange County

Orange County uses AlertOC, "a mass notification system designed to keep ... residents and businesses informed of emergencies and certain community events." You can sign up here

AlertOC uses 911 databases from telephone companies, so most land lines will already be in the system. 

San Bernardino County 

In San Bernardino County, the emergency alert system is called Telephone Emergency Notification System (TENS). You can sign up here.

TENS uses 911 databases from telephone companies, so most land lines will already be in the system. 

Riverside County 

Riverside County uses a system called Alert RivCo to "alert Riverside County community members of urgent actions to take during disasters, such as earthquakes, wildfires, and floods." You can sign up here

Alert RivCo uses 911 databases from telephone companies, so most land lines will already be in the system. 

San Luis Obispo County 

The San Luis Obispo County Sheriff's Office has a Reverse 9-1-1 alert system. You can sign up here

You can get updated information on all of the fires in Southern California by following KPCC's coverage here.

This story has been updated.