AirTalk for March 8, 2010

Do climate laws hurt California's economy? The movement to repeal AB 32

Mercer 6800

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The downtown skyline is enveloped in smog shortly before sunset on November 17, 2006 in Los Angeles, California.

In 2006, California passed the nation's most comprehensive climate legislation with Assembly Bill 32, which required cutting greenhouse gas emissions 25 percent by 2020. The bill included a provision allowing for its suspension if the state faced economic hardship. Now some lawmakers say that the time has come, arguing that AB 32 stands in the way of economic recovery. The Republican-sponsored proposal, formerly called the California Jobs Initiative, is gathering signatures to make the November ballot. If passed, it would delay implementation of AB 32 until the state's unemployment rate, now at 12.5 percent, drops to 4.8 percent or 5.5 percent for one year. Would lifting emissions caps allow for job creation?

Guests:


Dan Logue, California Assemblyman, representing counties in the 3rd Assembly District, including Butte, Lassen, Nevada, Placer, Plumas, Sierra and Yuba

Senator Fran Pavley, representing Senate District 23 - including portions of Los Angeles and Ventura Counties in the California Legislature


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