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Monitoring earthquakes with the internet?




Mathias Hoffmann of the German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ) - Helmholtz Centre Potsdam monitors their own developed GEOFON software, an earthquake alert system, based on a virtual seismic network, GEOFON Extended Virtual Network (GEVN) with 600 stations worldwide, on January 13, 2010 in Potsdam, Germany.
Mathias Hoffmann of the German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ) - Helmholtz Centre Potsdam monitors their own developed GEOFON software, an earthquake alert system, based on a virtual seismic network, GEOFON Extended Virtual Network (GEVN) with 600 stations worldwide, on January 13, 2010 in Potsdam, Germany.
Andreas Rentz/Getty Images

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While science cannot predict when an earthquake will occur, once one happens, it’s possible to warn people further from the epicenter that a temblor’s deadly shock waves are on the way. Using conventional technology, such a warning system would cost billions. But now researchers at UC Riverside and other universities want to create a virtual network of earthquake sensors via the Internet to monitor for the early stages of seismic activity in California. How would the system differ from earthquake monitors already in place? And how can your computer get linked into the system?

Learn more about the Quake-Catcher Network

Guest:


Elizabeth Cochran, assistant professor of seismology at UC Riverside