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White House endorses Don’t Ask Don’t Tell compromise




U.S. Secretary of Defense Robert Gates (L) and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Admiral Michael Mullen (R) take questions from members of the media during a press briefing at the Pentagon March 25, 2010 in Arlington, Virginia. Gates announced that the Pentagon will ease the enforcement of the 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' policy.
U.S. Secretary of Defense Robert Gates (L) and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Admiral Michael Mullen (R) take questions from members of the media during a press briefing at the Pentagon March 25, 2010 in Arlington, Virginia. Gates announced that the Pentagon will ease the enforcement of the 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' policy.
Alex Wong/Getty Images

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Yesterday the White House, Democratic leaders and gay groups reached a compromise on a measure that would repeal the Don’t Ask Don’t Tell after the Pentagon finishes a study of the military’s policy. Representative Patrick Murphy (D) of Pennsylvania says he has the votes to pass a bill to repeal the measure in the House and that vote counters in the Senate have assured him it will pass there too. When will the Pentagon complete its report? Is this the breakthrough gay advocates have been working for? Should the policy be repealed at all? If so—how soon?

Guests:

Ed O'Keefe, author of the "Federal Eye" blog at WashintonPost.com and Federal Government Reporter, Washington Post

Chris Neff, Deputy Executive Director of the Palm Center