AirTalk

Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more. Hosted by Larry Mantle

AirTalk for

AirTalk for November 16, 2011

From This Episode

2
4

High Court TV

This week, when the Supreme Court decided it will hear arguments over the constitutionality of the new health care law, legal watchers started salivating. Scheduled for next March, it's being characterized as one of the most important cases in the Court's history. Yesterday, C-SPAN sent a letter to Chief Justice John Roberts asking permission to televise the hearing. C-SPAN Chief Executive Officer, Brian Lamb wrote: "The Court's decision to schedule at least five-and-a-half hours of argument indicates the significance of this case. We ask that the Court further reflect this particular case's significance by supplementing your 'end of week audiocast' policy with live TV coverage. We believe the public interest is best served by live television coverage of this particular oral argument. It is a case which will affect every American's life, our economy, and will certainly be an issue in the upcoming presidential campaign. Additionally, a five-and-a-half hour argument begs for camera coverage -- interested citizens would be understandably challenged to adequately follow audio-only coverage of an event of this length will all the justices and various counsel participating." The letter continues by asking the justices to set aside any misgivings about cameras in the courtroom. What are those misgivings? Supreme Court scholar Lisa McElroy says the justices are worried for a number of reasons: it could alter the behavior of those in Court; it could violate the privacy and anonymity of the justices; it could risk embarrassment for the justices; it could endanger them; and they aren't comfortable with new technology.

5

Recent Episodes from AirTalk

Your pre-debate prep, service animals on planes & how pot might be taxed if Prop 64 passes

We take a look at each candidate's strategy and prep as they gear up for tonight's debate; airlines are seeking to limit the types of service animals allowed on planes but disability rights advocates are pushing back; Long Beach has proposed a new general tax to local businesses that distribute marijuana - some wonder if it could be a bellwether; Plus, we dive into the new venues added to L.A.'s Olympic bid.

Tulsa and the rhetoric surrounding recent police shootings, SoCal’s plan to reduce smog & TGI-FilmWeek!

We talk about the charges facing the Tulsa Police Officer who shot and killed an unarmed black man last Friday, as well as the rhetoric surrounding recent police shootings; SoCal vehicle registration fees may be hiked in an effort to pay for smog reduction programs – how much are you willing to pay to meet mandated emission cuts?; plus KPCC film critics join Larry Mantle to talk about the week’s newest releases, and we pay tribute to the late Curtis Hanson.

Latest on Charlotte, the proposal for a driverless LA & the intersection of race and wealth in SoCal

Protests have continued in Charlotte over the police shooting of a black man on Tuesday – the police chief said he plans to show the video of the shooting to the man’s family but not to the public – we bring you the latest developments; a new proposal to make L.A. an autonomous transit city by 2035 – what will it take?; and we look at how race and class are intertwined, and the implications for SoCal.

Rome’s out – what that means for LA’s Olympic bid, Trump’s charity scandal & the impact of presidential candidates' economic plans for SoCal

Rome is withdrawing for the 2024 Olympic bid after mayor Raggi called the bid financially irresponsible – what does that mean for L.A.?; according to the Washington Post, Trump used his foundation’s funds for a personal legal settlement – we take a closer look; plus, we host an economic roundtable to analyze the presidential candidates’ economic plans and their implications for SoCal.

Browse the AirTalk Archives

    Enjoy AirTalk? Try KPCC’s other programs.