AirTalk for December 30, 2011

News of the year: what defines 2011?

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Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images

Protestors gathering in Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt. On February 11, longtime Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak was ousted from power after three decades. What's the most defining news event of 2011 for you?

What’s your pick for the top news story of 2011? Was it the protests that swept the Arab World? The Occupy Wall Street Movement? The race for the Republican presidential nomination?

Was there a defining moment in the fall of Osama Bin Laden, Col. Muammar al-Qaddafi or Kim Jong Il? How about the death of Steve Jobs?

What were the lessons from the Japanese earthquake and tsunami, or the worldwide economic fallout?

Whose wedding was most tweet-worthy – Kim Kardashian’s or Prince William’s?

Some stories are so big they are missed in typical year end wrap ups, meta issues like the powerful impact of social media on our culture or the effect of global climate change on our planet and its future. Perhaps those are the most important to you.

WEIGH IN:

It’s the year in review, Airtalk style and we need to hear from our listeners: what stories moved you the most? Which events will have the most far flung implications?

Guest:

Roy Peter Clark, Senior Scholar at the Poynter Institute

Todd Gitlin, Professor of Journalism and Sociology and Chair of the Ph. D. Program in Communications at Columbia University. Gitlin is at work on a book about the Occupy Wall Street movement to be published early next year by HarperCollins.

Tim Cavanaugh, Managing Editor of Reason.com


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