AirTalk for March 27, 2012

More women are becoming primary breadwinners

The Richer Sex: How the New Majority of Female Breadwinners is Transforming Sex, Love and Family

Almost 40 percent of American working wives now out-earn their husbands. If this trend persists, women may over take men as the primary breadwinners in a generation.

In her new book “The Richer Sex: How the New Majority of Female Breadwinners is Transforming Sex, Love and Family” (Simon & Shuster), Washington Post reporter Liza Mundy charts the social and cultural ripples that will accompany this shift in income. Mundy proposes that instead of resisting the change, we should all embrace it. Many of the men she interviewed whose wives were the main breadwinners enjoyed their stay-at-home status, the intensity of hands-on parenting, and even became competitive as they honed their domestic skills.

Mundy contends that men are seeking women with equal or superior educational and earning levels, and women’s economic power unleashes their own sexual energy and self-confidence. Women, she found, are still nervous about assuming the role of primary provider, and fear that high ambition comes across as masculine.

How will relationships evolve to cope with this economic shift? As a woman who earns more, how do you feel about being the primary bread winner? As a man who earns less than your wife, girlfriend or partner, what challenges do you face, and what are the benefits?

Guest:

Liza Mundy, Washington Post writer, and author of “The Richer Sex: How the New Majority of Female Breadwinners is Transforming Sex, Love and Family” (Simon & Shuster)


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