AirTalk for May 24, 2012

Edmunds releases 100 most powerful cars list

SSC

#1. 2009 SSC Ultimate Aero: 1,287 hp at 6,075 rpm

Hennessey

#2. 2010 Hennessey Venom GT: 1,200 hp at 6,500 rpm

#5. 2004 Lotec Sirius: 1,200 hp at 6,300 rpm

Bristol

#8. 2006 Bristol Fighter T: 1,012 hp at 5,600 rpm

HTT

#13. 2013 HTT Plethore LC-750: 750 hp @ 6,750 rpm.

Dauer

#18. 1994 Dauer 962 LM: 730 hp at 7,400 rpm

Pagani

#21. 2012 Pagani Huayra: 700 hp at 6,300 rpm

Ferrari of North America

#53. 2007 Ferrari 599 GTB Fiorano: 611 hp at 7,600 rpm

Lamborghini

#71. 2010 Lamborghini Gallardo LP570-4 Superleggera: 570 hp at 8,000 rpm

Audi of America

#78. 2011 Audi R8 GT: 560 hp at 8,000 rpm

#84. 1992 Bugatti EB110: 553 hp at 8,000 rpm

Bentley

#86-85. (Tie) 2006 Bentley Continental Flying Spur: 552 hp at 6,100 rpm

Mercedes-Benz

#91. 2012 Mercedes Benz ML63 AMG: 550 hp at 5,750 rpm

Saleen

#92. 2000 Saleen S7: 550 hp at 6,500 rpm

Ford Motor Company

#95. 2005 Ford GT: 550 hp at 6,000 rpm

Porsche Cars North America, Inc.

#100. 1996 Porsche 911 GT1 Straßenversion: 544 hp at 7,000 rpm


The car experts at Edmunds just released a turbo-charged list of the 100 most powerful cars – of all time. Think you know muscle cars? Think again.

Unless you’re a zillionaire car collector or have a PhD in automotive power, chances are, there are several you’ve never even heard of. The “weakest” of the bunch, if you can believe it, packs 544 horsepower. Coming in at #1 is the 2009 SSC Ultimate Aero. The 1,287-horsepower super car can go zero to 60 in less than 2.8 seconds, with a top speed of 257 miles per hour. It’s a thing of beauty too, assuming you don’t blink as it goes by.

Four other cars, including two Bugattis, break the 1,200-hp barrier. Today is the golden age of car power. The oldest vehicle on the list is a mere 23 years old and the top ten were all built in the last ten years. “Still, these are some of the rarest vehicles on the planet,” says Edmunds.com Editor in Chief Scott Oldham.

How did each car land on this list? How were ties broken? And were any worthy machines left in the dust?

GUEST

Scott Oldham, Editor in Chief, Edmunds.com


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