AirTalk for August 2, 2012

Chick-fil-A feels the controversy — and the love

Supporters Flock To Restaurants On Chick-Fil-A Appreciation Day

Tom Pennington/Getty Images

Customers wait in line at a Chick-fil-A restaurant on August 1, 2012 in Fort Worth, Texas.

Chick-fil-a

Ashley Myers-Turner/KPCC

Brian McIlroy protests Chick-fil-a's anti gay-marriage stance outside the Hollywood Chick-fil-a location.

Chick-fil-a

Ashley Myers-Turner/KPCC

Arthur Navarro yells "Don't promote hate. Don't eat Chick-fil-a! Stand with our President. Equality for all!" while encouraging motorists and passers by to join in by honking their horn and joining his chant.

Chick-fil-a

Ashley Myers-Turner/KPCC

Meggan Anderson joins the Chick-fil-a protest, showing her alliance with PETA and her view that chickens deserve fair treatment.

Chick-fil-a

Ashley Myers-Turner/KPCC

American singer and conservative political commentator Pat Boone stopped by to pick up lunch and support CEO Dan Cathy and his family. "They have their personal views. And in America they're entitled to express those views," says Boone.

Chick-fil-a

Ashley Myers-Turner/KPCC

Protesters made a variety of homemade signs showing their feelings about Chick-fil-a's values.


Chick-fil-A president Dan Cathy set off a firestorm when he publicly aired his anti-same-sex marriage views. The company has since attempted to distance itself from Cathy’s comments, issuing a statement saying they would “leave the policy debate over same-sex marriage to the government and political arena.”

But the damage has been done — or has it?

When gay rights supporters clamored for a proposed boycott, former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee responded by declaring Wednesday, August 1st “Chick-fil-A Appreciation Day.” He did the company a huge favor: customers swarmed the fast-food outlets throughout the country, making it a record day for sales for the chain.

But wait, there’s more. Mayors of several cities with large LGBT populations have spoken out against having Chick-fil-A in their cities; Chicago mayor Rahm Emanuel said the company’s values “are not Chicago values. They disrespect our fellow neighbors and residents.” Meanwhile, same-sex couples are encouraged by the LGBT community to swarm their local Chick-fil-A and commit a Public Display of Affection on Friday, designated "National Same-Sex Kiss Day at Chick-fil-A.”

Does the controversy help or hurt the chain? Should corporations stay out of public policy debate? Or are they right to air their values and count on the support of the portion of consumers who share them?

Guests:

Ira Kalb, Assistant professor of Clinical Marketing, USC Marshall School of Business; Expert in branding, image creation, marketing and corporation communications

Bill Peacock, Vice President of research & planning and the director of the Center for Economic Freedom at the Texas Public Policy Foundation

Larry Chavis, Assistant Professor of Strategy and Entrepreneurship, University of North Carolina


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