AirTalk for August 17, 2012

How should the city of LA enforce mandatory condom use in the adult-film industry?

peachy92/Flickr/Creative Commons

Can the use of condoms on adult-film shoots be monitored properly?

A working group in the City of Los Angeles’ City Administrative Office issued a report Wednesday with recommendations on how the city should enforce the mandatory use of condoms in the city’s adult film industry.

The ordinance to require condom on porn sets went into effect earlier this year, but government officials are trying figure out how to enforce such a tricky ordinance. The adult film working group that issued the study has recommended the city identify health-care workers who could visit sets to enforce the new law.

“We came up with what we thought was a common sense approach to establish an enforcement mechanism,” said Miguel Santana, City Administrative Officer for the City of Los Angeles, on AirTalk.

City leaders are now hoping that the condom rule will be expanded to Los Angeles County so that the county health department would be in charge of inspecting adult film sets. County officials, as reported by the L.A. Times, say an adult film permit office would cost a minimum of $291,000 a year. Film L.A. said it issued 22,000 film permits last year and 480 of those were for adult film shoots.

Opponents of the ordinance say it impossible to enforce and that if it goes ahead many producers will leave the southland.

“The thing that’s so frustrating is that it’s completely unnecessary. We haven’t had a transmission of HIV on an adult set in more than eight years, nationwide. So it really is a non-entity,” said Diane Duke, Executive Director of the Free Speech Coalition, on AirTalk.

Michael Weinstein, President of the AIDS Healthcare Foundation says that it is not all about HIV/AIDS cases but the general health of these porn actors.

“There was an 18-percent increase in syphilis cases between 2010 and 2011. We had 164,000 cases of chlamydia in the state. And we had 27,000 cases of gonorrhea and 2,500 syphilis cases. STDs are a huge problem and this industry is a hot spot,” Weinstein added.

The new review process will take at least 90 days to develop after officials issue a request for proposals, solicit bids and establish a fee program for the porn industry.

Weigh In:


Will this law ever be able to be enforced? Will the extra layer of bureaucracy send the already struggling film industry out of Los Angeles? How will adult-film workers be protected from diseases and is this law the most effective way to ensure their health?

Guests:

Miguel Santana, City Administrative Officer, City of Los Angeles
Diane Duke, Executive Director, Free Speech Coalition
Michael Weinstein, President, AIDS Healthcare Foundation


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