AirTalk for July 5, 2013

The latest from Egypt: a fresh start for democracy, or a return to autocracy?

Egyptian President Morsi Ousted In Military Coup

Ed Giles/Getty Images

CAIRO, EGYPT - JULY 5: Supporters of former Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi demonstrate in front of the headquarters of the Egyptian Republican Guard in Nasr City in Cairo, Egypt. (Photo by Ed Giles/Getty Images).

With former President Mohamed Morsi now properly deposed and placed under house arrest, many questions remain for the future of Egyptian governance. The military, whose popularity among Egyptians was at a soaring high in recent months, appears to have carried out the will of the Egyptian people by ousting Morsi. Egyptians were fed up with stumbling economic policies that kept Egypt mired in billions of dollars in debt, with a quarter of its population unemployed and coping with skyrocketing prices for basic goods. Anti-Morsi protesters were also displeased at how increasingly authoritarian Morsi’s Muslim Brotherhood regime had become, with most major government posts taken up Muslim Brotherhood leaders and an increasingly religious approach to their politics.

But Morsi supporters and much of the media have described the former President’s ousting as coup, and many are left wondering whether the military had the right to do what it did. The response from the US and Middle Eastern countries has been mixed, and the military’s rampant arrests of Muslim Brotherhood loyalists leaves more doubt that justice and democracy will be served in Egypt.

Will the Muslim Brotherhood and other Islamic groups be shunned from the pending political process? Is the military instituting its own secular authoritarianism?

Guests:

Jahd Khalil, Cairo-based journalist who reports for the Cairo-based newspaper Mada Masr and the Abu Dhabi-based The National

Robert Springborg, Professor in the Department of National Security Affairs at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterrey, CA


blog comments powered by Disqus