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The NFL’s Pro Bowl gets more than just a facelift




Kyle Rudolph #82 of the NFC's Minnesota Vikings with the Pro Bowl MVP Trophy after the 2013 AFC-NFC Pro Bowl on January 27, 2013 at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii.
Kyle Rudolph #82 of the NFC's Minnesota Vikings with the Pro Bowl MVP Trophy after the 2013 AFC-NFC Pro Bowl on January 27, 2013 at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii.
Kent Nishimura/Getty Images

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Professional football’s all-star game, the Pro Bowl, got a shot in the arm Wednesday when the NFL announced changes to the contest. The AFC vs. NFC format that has been around since 1970 is out and a new fantasy football type draft will be in place. This year two Hall of Famers, Jerry Rice and Deion Sanders, will choose teams based on a a pool of players chosen by the fans. Conference affiliation will no longer be a factor. The actual game will also undergo some pretty big changes.

While the NFL itself continues to grow and draw record television audiences, the Pro Bowl has been criticized by fans and even the players themselves. Do you think these changes will make the game more interesting to watch? Do you tune in for the Pro Bowl each year, or does a game with no actual consequences not interest you? How would you change the Pro Bowl to make it more relevant?

Guest:
Mike Pesca, national correspondent for NPR who frequently reports on sports