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Reconceiving the GOP without the Tea Party




New Jersey Governor Chris Christie speaks at a Reform Agenda Town Hall meeting at the New Jersey Manufacturers Company facility in Hammonton, New Jersey. Christie is seen by some as the savior of the GOP with his more moderate viewpoints.
New Jersey Governor Chris Christie speaks at a Reform Agenda Town Hall meeting at the New Jersey Manufacturers Company facility in Hammonton, New Jersey. Christie is seen by some as the savior of the GOP with his more moderate viewpoints.
Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images

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A lot of ink has been spilled on how the Republican Party can take back the hearts and minds of Americans and recapture the White House in 2016. Some say that the party has to be able to win the Latino vote, others say it leads to appeal to younger voters.

David Frum, former speechwriter for George W. Bush and well-known political observer, forwards another option. He wants to see Tea Party members purged from the Republican Party so it can become more centrist.

What would the Republican Party look like without the Tea Party? Is it even possible? Would marginalizing the Tea Party lead to further fragmentation within the Republican Party?

Guests:

Ron Elving, NPR News’ Senior Washington Editor

Sean Sullivan, Political Reporter, Washington Post; today’s piece “How the tea party lost on Tuesday night” 

Sal Russo, Co-founder and Chief Strategist, Tea Party Express