AirTalk for March 18, 2014

Will the US and EU use energy sanctions against Russia?

Congress considers response to Russian action in Ukraine

AFP/AFP/Getty Images

With a flag depicting President Vladimir Putin (C) pro-Kremlin activists rally at the Red Square in Moscow, on March 18, 2014, to celebrate the incorporation of Crimea. Putin pushed today every emotional button of the collective Russian psyche as he justified the incorporation of Crimea, citing everything from ancient history to Russia's demand for respect to Western double standards.

Russian President Vladimir Putin and the Prime Minister of Crimea signed official documents to incorporate Crimea into the Russian Federation. The ceremony took place in Sevastopol, the swift result of Sunday’s vote on the referendum to annex Crimea. Ukrainian government has expressed anger over the referendum and its results, calling the annexation a “robbery.”

Russia defied sanctions from the U.S. and European Union in its bid for Crimea, prompting international criticism and discussion about what the future holds in the politically tense region. Will the United States and E.U. impose oil and energy sanctions on Russia? What kinds of international intervention would be effective? How might things proceed?

Guests:

Stephen Blank, Senior Fellow at the American Foreign Policy Council

Tim Boersma, fellow in the Energy Security Initiative at the Brookings Institution - a Washington D.C. based public policy think tank: Boersma wrote this recent opinion piece published in the Los Angeles Times “Russia's advantage”


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