AirTalk for April 15, 2015

Is Google's one-day sale of Google Glass really about buying social acceptance?

US-POLITICS-SUMMIT

BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images

An attendee uses a Google Glass during the White House Youth Summit at the White House December 4, 2013 in Washington, DC.

Today, a limited number of U.S. residents can buy Google Glasses - without an invite. At a price of $1,500, the Internet-connected headset can be yours, but just how many people want to own them?

A recent survey by market research firm Toluna showed 72 percent of Americans don't want the glasses because of privacy concerns. Today, Consumer Watchdog outlined its top 10 worries about Google Glasses, including stalking and safety issues.

Will Google overcome the concerns by introducing the product slowly but surely?

Guest: 

John M. Simpson, Consumer Watchdog's Privacy Project Director

Jeremy Kaplan, Editor-in-chief, Digital Trends - news and review site focused on technology


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