AirTalk for June 9, 2014

NCAA antitrust lawsuit to have huge implications for college athletes’ compensation

ARKANSAS V UCLA

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UCLA FORWARD ED O''BANNON CUTS DOWN THE NET AFTER THEIR 89-78 VICTORY OVER ARKANSAS IN THE NCAA FINAL AT THE KINGDOME IN SEATTLE ON APRIL 3, 1995:,

Should college athletes be paid if their image is used for profit? That’s the question  former UCLA basketball star Ed O’Bannon and 20 former college athletes are raising in an Oakland courtroom today.

The plaintiffs argue that upon graduation, a former student athlete should become entitled to financial compensation for NCAA's commercial uses of his or her image. But the NCAA counters that these are amateur players and that any compensation elevates them.

Both sides agree that the outcome could have major ramification for the future of college sports.

Guests:

Michael A. Carrier, professor of law at Rutgers School of Law, expert in antitrust, copyright, patent, and innovation law

Anthony Sabino, professor of law at St. John’s University in New York, expert in antitrust law


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