AirTalk for June 11, 2014

Post-Vergara v. California: Carving out a vision for the state’s education system

Vergara v California trial

Adolfo Guzman-Lopez/KPCC

Julia Macias, one of nine plaintiffs in the Vergara v. California trial, welcomes a judge's ruling striking down teacher job protections.

On Tuesday, California Superior Court Judge Rolf Treu issued some surprising decisions on some third-rail topics in education. He struck down teacher tenure protection, seniority-based job protection and existing disciplinary policy on the grounds that they were unconstitutional and harmed students.

RELATED: LA school teachers say Vergara ruling feels like an attack

The case is headed for an appeals court before any changes go into effect, but the landmark case raises the question: if these three elements are unconstitutional, then how should the education system look?

The plaintiffs took issue with teacher tenure after two years, but should there be any teacher tenure at all? If not, how to do you entice talented teachers to take on difficult, lower-paying jobs and stick with them?

RELATED: Vergara trial: Calif. judge says state teacher protections unconstitutional (updated)

Both sides agree students need stability to succeed, but what does that look like? Guest host Patt Morrison talks with several leaders in the field of education about their opinion of the ruling and their vision for the classroom.

Guests:

John Deasy, superintendent, LAUSD

Alex Caputo-Pearl, President, United Teachers Los Angeles

Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers

Diane Ravitch, Research Professor of Education at New York University; former Assistant Secretary of Education (1991-1993)

Eric Lerum, VP of National Policy, StudentsFirst, an educational reform group founded by former D.C. Public Schools Chancellor Michelle Rhee


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