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Court rules: Home caregivers barred from suing for damages caused by Alzheimer patients




The California Supreme Court ruled Monday that home healthcare workers hired to assist Alzheimer's patients may not sue their employers for injuries inflicted by patients.
The California Supreme Court ruled Monday that home healthcare workers hired to assist Alzheimer's patients may not sue their employers for injuries inflicted by patients.
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The California Supreme Court ruled Monday that home healthcare workers hired to assist Alzheimer's patients may not sue their employers for injuries inflicted by patients.

The 5-2 decision drafted by Justice Carole A. Corrigan, said that employers were not liable for caregivers if the employees were warned of the risks prior to employment and the injury was caused by symptoms of the disease.

The case was taken to the state Supreme Court after Carolyn Gregory filed a lawsuit against Bernard and Lorraine Cott after Lorraine, who suffered from Alzheimer’s, bumped into Gregory while she washed a knife, leaving her injuries that left pain and permanent numbness in some of Gregory’s fingers.

Do you feel the Supreme Court decision leaves homecare workers vulnerable in their patients’ homes? How can employers take preventive measures to ensure safety for their workers? We’ll also look at how other states around the country deal with the issue.

Guest:

John Nockleby, Professor of Law, Director, Civil Justice Program at Loyola Law School