AirTalk for August 18, 2014

What growing divisions within Democratic Party over Syria, Iraq mean for the party

US-POLITICS-CLINTON

NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images

Former US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton shakes hands with an attendee as she signs her book 'Hards Choices' at the Bunch of Grapes bookstore on Martha's Vineyard on August 13, 2014. Clinton on August 12 denied attacking US President Barack Obama over his foreign policy in Syria and Iraq, insisting she was looking forward to 'hugging it out' with the US leader when they meet at a party later this week.

There’s a growing division within the Democratic party over how the U.S. should address the crises in Syria and Iraq. It’s a division that’s pitting democrats like President Obama against more hawkish politicians such as Senator Bob Corker and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, who’ve criticized the Obama administration’s more dovish approaches to foreign policy issues.

The latest fissure arguable began with an interview Clinton gave to The Atlantic, where she referred to earlier approaches to Syria under the Obama administration as a “failure.” Is this just a healthy debate that will strengthen the party or does this apparent intra-party fighting mark something more sinister that could have lasting political implications?

Guests:

Will Marshall, president, Progressive Policy Institute, a D.C.-based think tank

Brian Katulis, Senior Fellow, Center for American Progress, where his work focuses on U.S. national security policy in the Middle East and South Asia


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