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Impact on homeless, city as council pre-approves ordinances on homeless possession removal




Homeless women prepare for another day and night on the street near Skid Row in Los Angeles, California on May 12, 2015. A report released by the Los Angeles Homeless Authority on May 11 showed a 12% increase in the homeless population in both Los Angeles city and county, which according to the report have been driven by soaring rents, low wages and stubbornly high unemployment. One of the most striking findings from the biennial figures released saw the number of makeshift encampments, tents and vehicles occupied by the homeless increased 85%.
Homeless women prepare for another day and night on the street near Skid Row in Los Angeles, California on May 12, 2015. A report released by the Los Angeles Homeless Authority on May 11 showed a 12% increase in the homeless population in both Los Angeles city and county, which according to the report have been driven by soaring rents, low wages and stubbornly high unemployment. One of the most striking findings from the biennial figures released saw the number of makeshift encampments, tents and vehicles occupied by the homeless increased 85%.
FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images

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As the homeless population continues to rise in Southern California and encampments continue to pop up, so does the amount of stuff the homeless bring with them.

After a nearly unanimous vote at Tuesday’s City Council meeting, homeless people will have significantly less time to move their possessions after they’re told to clear out of an area. Two ordinances were given preliminary approval, one that covers parks and another that covers sidewalks. They would also let officials immediately take away bigger possessions like couches, chairs, and large tents.

The lone ‘nay’ vote came from District 1 Councilman Gil Cedillo, who told the L.A. Times that the strategy of criminalizing the homeless is clearly not working, and these ordinances simply continue to bolster that strategy.

What do you think about these ordinances? Where should the city draw the line between protecting the rights of homeless people and meeting the public’s demands for clean and safe public spaces?

Guests:

Gil Cedillo, Los Angeles City Councilmember representing District 1, which represents neighborhoods in northeast and northwest L.A. including Highland Park, Glassell Park, and Echo Park. He was the lone ‘nay’ vote at last Tuesday’s meeting on the two ordinances.

Rev. Andy Bales, CEO of Union Rescue Mission