AirTalk®

Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more. Hosted by Larry Mantle

The final frontier: What it took to get the first up-close images of outer space

by AirTalk®

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Since their launch in 1977, the Voyagers have garnered many first glimpses including photographs of Jupiter, Uranus, Neptune and even an inaugural portrait of our solar system. Keystone/Getty Images

It’s been almost four decades since the launch of JPL’s Voyager mission.

The plan?

The two spacecraft would take a four-year tour of our outer planetary system and bring us the first up-close images of Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus. Since their launch in 1977, the Voyagers have garnered many first glimpses including photographs of Jupiter, Uranus, Neptune and even an inaugural portrait of our solar system.

The documentary, “First Steps of Voyager,” shows rare footage of the project’s events and accounts from those who experienced the first encounters with outer space.

The film’s writer director and producer, Blaine Baggett, and former Voyager project scientist, Ed Stone, speak with Larry Mantle and share what it was like to give an inside look at the project that brought the landscape of the universe to earth.

“The Footsteps of Voyager” will be screened at 7:30 p.m. this Wednesday, Oct. 28 at CalTech’s Beckman Auditorium in Pasadena. Click here for more details.

Guests:

Blaine Baggett, director of the Office of Communication and Education at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and writer, director and producer of the documentary, “The Footsteps of Voyager”

Ed Stone, professor of physics at The California Institute of Technology and former director of the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Stone served as the Voyager mission's project scientist

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