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Debating new weed tax scholarship created in a Colorado county




Marijuana plants grow on the grounds of the Bob Marley Museum in Kingston, Jamaica.
Marijuana plants grow on the grounds of the Bob Marley Museum in Kingston, Jamaica.
Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

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In Pueblo County, Colorado - described as being bullish on burgeoning marijuana ventures - voters approved a new weed tax on Tuesday that will create a marijuana-funded college scholarship.

New taxes are usually opposed by industry, but Pueblo's booming pot players didn't oppose the measure, which brings their tax rate from 15 percent to 20 percent, phased in over five years.

Is this measure anything like a traditional "sin tax" on tobacco or alcohol? Or is it reminiscent of tobacco sponsorship of community events that was effectively banned by the Food and Drug Administration?

Guests:

Sal Pace, a Commissioner of Pueblo County, Colorado; Pace authored the “weed scholarship” taxation policy passed by voters on Tuesday

Rachel Barry, Policy Researcher, Policy Researcher, UCSF’s Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education; Commissioner, (Regulatory & Tax Structure Working Group), Blue Ribbon Commission on Marijuana Policy (created by Lieutenant Governor Gavin Newsom)