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Do rich schools benefit more from the California lottery than poor schools?




Children at Scripps Ranch KinderCare in San Diego play in their classroom on October 1, 2013 in San Diego, CA.
Children at Scripps Ranch KinderCare in San Diego play in their classroom on October 1, 2013 in San Diego, CA.
Robert Benson/Getty Images for Knowledge Unive

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It seems like a win-win situation: For just a couple dollars, you get a California lottery ticket and a shot at big winnings, and California schools get a cut of lottery profits.

But according to a new report out from EdBuild, a non-profit group that addresses funding inequities in public education, the California lottery distributes funding unfairly.

EdBuild argues that not many rich people actually buy lotto tickets, yet the public schools that their children attend get as much money as poorer school districts, if not slightly more.

Should distribution of lottery funds be based on the needs of a school? If the California lottery makes up a small percent of school budgets, does the distribution method make a difference?

Guests:

Alex Traverso, Spokesman for the California Lottery

Rebecca Sibilia, Founder and CEO of EdBuild, a non-profit group that works on funding inequities in public education and recently released a new report on California lotto distribution