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Analysts set up election 2016 road ahead after NY primary goes chalk




Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks after winning the New York state primary on April 19, 2016 in New York City.
Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks after winning the New York state primary on April 19, 2016 in New York City.
John Moore/Getty Images

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Home field advantage proved too much to overcome for Bernie Sanders and Ted Cruz in the New York State primaries on Wednesday as New Yorkers placed their support overwhelmingly behind frontrunners Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.

The former Secretary of State earned about 58 percent of the vote in New York, earning her 139 pledged delegates. Donald Trump also won convincingly with over 60 percent of the vote, which nets him nearly all of the 95 delegates at stake.

While a victory for Bernie Sanders wouldn’t have done much to cut into Secretary Clinton’s commanding delegate lead, it might have been an indicator that the Democratic party had failed to unite behind Clinton. Speaking in Vermont, Sanders expressed concerns with the voter registration process in New York, saying 30 percent of eligible voters couldn’t vote because they registered as Independents instead of Democrats or Republicans.

As for Ted Cruz, he finished third behind Trump and Ohio Governor John Kasich, and he isn’t expected to do well in the Northeastern and Mid-Atlantic states who have primaries next week.

The victories pad both frontrunners’ delegate leads as voters hit the polls on Tuesday in Connecticut, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Delaware. But with each passing primary, the importance of California becomes more and more clear in the race for each party’s nomination.

Guests:

Lisa Garcia Bedolla, Chancellor’s Professor of education and political science at UC Berkeley

Pete Peterson, dean of the School of Public Policy and executive director of the Davenport Institute at Pepperdine University; he was also a 2014 Republican candidate for California Secretary of State