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Positive and negative effects of protests on Trump’s CA primary campaign




A supporter of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump holds a sign during his campaign rally at the Orange County Fair and Event Center, April 28, 2016, in Costa Mesa, California.
A supporter of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump holds a sign during his campaign rally at the Orange County Fair and Event Center, April 28, 2016, in Costa Mesa, California.
DAVID MCNEW/AFP/Getty Images

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Protesters and conflict are no stranger to Donald Trump rallies. Such was the case last night in Orange County, where police and protesters briefly butted heads in the wake of a campaign speech in Costa Mesa.

20 people were arrested as rocks were thrown and windows were broken. Trump has shown in the past that he’s able to shake off these brief instances of violence, sometimes even using them to play to his supporters.

It makes sense, then, that Trump could see this kind of conflict as free advertising for his campaign, because the media is going to cover it. On the other side, what if a tipping point is reached in the protesting and a line gets crossed. Would that damage Trump’s chances of winning California’s primary?

For more on last night’s rally in Costa Mesa, click here.

Guests:

David Mark, CNN politics editor and author of the book “Dog Whistles, Walk-Backs, and Washington Handshakes"; he tweets @DavidMarkDC

Bill Whalen, a research fellow with the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. He has served as a media consultant for many policy leaders, including former Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger, former congress