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Why state legislature has been unable to move on police transparency bills




A Los Angeles Police officer holds his firearm during demonstrations near the shooting site of Manuel Jamines on September 8, 2010 in Los Angeles. Protesters demonstrated after the shooting of Jamines, a Guatemalan immigrant, by LAPD officers.
A Los Angeles Police officer holds his firearm during demonstrations near the shooting site of Manuel Jamines on September 8, 2010 in Los Angeles. Protesters demonstrated after the shooting of Jamines, a Guatemalan immigrant, by LAPD officers.
Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

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Despite heightened awareness around police-involved shootings in the nation, California has yet to pass a major bill to give the public more access to police information, reports the Los Angeles Times.

Five major proposals were introduced this year. A state Senate committee on Tuesday voted down two police transparency-related bills, the paper reports, joining the fate of two other bills killed last month.

The lone surviving bill that has made it out of committee concerns the release of video footage involving an officer’s death.

Guest:

Liam Dillon, reporter at the Los Angeles Times who’s been following the story

Peter Scheer, executive director of the First Amendment Coalition, a nonprofit organization working for a more open and accountable government