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What Trump’s presidency means for the Supreme Court




The courtroom of he U.S. Supreme Court  is seen September 30, 2016 in Washington, DC. The Supreme Court will return for a new term on Monday, October 3.
The courtroom of he U.S. Supreme Court is seen September 30, 2016 in Washington, DC. The Supreme Court will return for a new term on Monday, October 3.
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Given Justice Antonin Scalia’s empty seat and the advanced age of some members of the Supreme Court, President-elect Trump could fundamentally shift the Court to the right by filling not one but potentially two justice slots during his four years in office.

During his campaign, Trump repeatedly promised to fill Scalia’s vacancy with a conservative justice, releasing a shortlist of potential nominees in September. Now, Trump’s win guarantees a conservative majority on the Court and many liberals fear that civil rights, marriage equality and reproductive rights may be at risk.

This Sunday, in an interview on “60 Minutes,” he sent seemingly mixed messages, saying the question of gay marriage was “settled” by the Court, though Roe v. Wade might still be overturned.

What do you think are the implications of a SCOTUS shaped by President Trump? What are your hopes or fears?

Guest: 

Margaret Russell, Professor of Law at Santa Clara University; her areas of expertise include Constitutional law and the Supreme Court