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Is it time for the US to impose greater sanctions on Russia?




Director of National Intelligence James Clapper (L) and United States Cyber Command and National Security Agency Director Admiral Michael Rogers testify before the Senate Armed Services Committee in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill January 5, 2017 in Washington, DC.
Director of National Intelligence James Clapper (L) and United States Cyber Command and National Security Agency Director Admiral Michael Rogers testify before the Senate Armed Services Committee in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill January 5, 2017 in Washington, DC.
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

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For the first time, US intelligence chiefs publicly stated this morning that senior Russian leadership approved cyberhacking to influence the US presidential race.

The statements came before the Senate Armed Services Committee on Capitol Hill. Director of National Intelligence James Clapper was joined by NSA head Admiral Michael Rogers and Undersecretary of Defense for Intelligence Marcel Lettre. The trio submitted joint remarks to the Armed Service Committee that claimed Russian cyberattacks pose a "major threat" to the US. They cited as vulnerable the country's power grid, communications systems, financial institutions, government operations, and military.

Incoming President-elect Trump has consistently expressed skepticism about Russian responsibility. Some Republicans in Congress have gone along with that but others, like Senators John McCain and Lindsey Graham, take issue with Trump's posture on Russia and the credibility of US intelligence gathering.

If Congress becomes convinced Russia was behind the DNC and John Podesta hacks, and that the country poses a larger cyber threat to the US, what can it do? Particularly if the new President doesn't agree? Larry and his panel weigh Congress' options for dealing with Russia.

Guests:

William Danvers, Senior Fellow specializing in National Security at the Center for American Progress - a left-leaning think tank in Washington, D.C.

Anton Fedyashin,  Professor of Russian History, American University in Washington, D.C.