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A closer look at the CDC’s new quarantine rules




One of two medical evaluation rooms lies empty in the U.S. Public Health Service Quarantine Station in Atlanta's Hartsfield Jackson Internaional Airport November 28, 2005 in Atlanta, Georgia.
One of two medical evaluation rooms lies empty in the U.S. Public Health Service Quarantine Station in Atlanta's Hartsfield Jackson Internaional Airport November 28, 2005 in Atlanta, Georgia.
Barry Williams/Getty Images

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According to an op-ed in the New York Times, the dynamics of quarantines are changing nationwide. At the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a final rule was decided this month to issue federal restrictions on on interstate travel in a health crisis.

This is a sweeping change from the previous way that quarantines were previously enforced--mostly on the state level. Critics of the new rules point out that a clear path to challenge quarantines in federal court are no longer in place, and that a person who may be showing symptoms, but has not been diagnosed may be kept in quarantine for an unspecified amount of time.

But the CDC is hoping that by expanding these new regulations, it will improve and protect people from epidemics like the Ebola outbreak of 2014.

Larry speaks today with James Hodge, director of the Public Health Law and Policy Program at Arizona State University to hear more about these new quarantine regulations, and what they mean in case an epidemic hits.

Guest:

James G. Hodge, Jr., professor of Public Health Law and Ethics and Director, Public Health Law and Policy Program at Arizona State University’s Sandra Day O’Connor School of Law