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Under pressure: should homework be abolished for elementary school students?




A student enters the library at a secondary school on December 1, 2014 in London, England. Education funding is expected to be an issue in the general election in 2015.
A student enters the library at a secondary school on December 1, 2014 in London, England. Education funding is expected to be an issue in the general election in 2015.
Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images

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In a recent opinion piece for Time, writer Vicki Abeles argues for doing away with all homework in school.  

While the amount given per grade and subject continues to be debated, proponents continue to see a real need for homework. The belief is that with homework, additional practice provides for greater mastery of subjects, frees up limited class time, encourages parents’ active participation in their child's understanding, and promotes accountability and responsibility. Opponents see it a different way. Homework adds stress and anxiety, inhibits the ability to deeply pursue other passions such as sports and the arts, and clearly affects family life.

What has your experience been? How effective is homework in the learning process?  

Guests:

Vicki Abeles, author of the book, "Beyond Measure: Rescuing an Overscheduled, Overtested, Underestimated Generation," and director and producer of the documentary, “Race to Nowhere,” which looks at the pressure students face today

Jay Mathews, an education columnist for the Washington Post who has been following the issue