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Pants on fire: What web data tells us about our lying habits




A large wooden Pinocchio puppet attracts customers into a shop selling wooden art in the city centre of Vienna on November 28, 2009.
A large wooden Pinocchio puppet attracts customers into a shop selling wooden art in the city centre of Vienna on November 28, 2009.
JOE KLAMAR/AFP/Getty Images

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What percentage of Americans as racist? Does online advertising really work? Do video games really make our kids more violent?

These are just some of the big questions “Everybody Lies: Big Data, New Data, and What the Internet Can Tell Us about Who We Really Are” attempts to answer. In his new book, Seth Stephens-Davidowitz points to the mountain of misinformation we received due to the simple fact that people lie. To get around the facade of how people feel, Stephens-Davidowitz uses Google search results to shed a light on our collective human behavior.

Host Larry Mantle checks in with the economist and former Google data scientist to talk about how new data can help us dive deeper into the core of human psyche.

Guest:

Seth Stephens-Davidowitz, contributing op-ed writer for the New York Times, former Google data scientist and author of “Everybody Lies: Big Data, New Data, and What the Internet Can Tell Us about Who We Really Are” (HarperCollins, 2017); he tweets @SethS_D