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With the GOP ‘skinny repeal’ bill defeat, what’s next for the future of health care?




Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC), Sen. Ron Johnson (R-WI), Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-LA) and Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) hold a news conference to say they would not support a 'Skinny Repeal' of health care at the U.S.
Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC), Sen. Ron Johnson (R-WI), Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-LA) and Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) hold a news conference to say they would not support a 'Skinny Repeal' of health care at the U.S.
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

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It was a whirlwind Friday morning at the Capitol.

The Senate failed to pass what is being called the “skinny” repeal health care bill. The bill would strip the individual mandate part of the Affordable Care Act, as well as the employer mandate that requires companies with a certain number of employees to provide health insurance for their workers.

Lawmakers in the Senate had just a few hours to digest the language of the skinny repeal bill before a vote. As expected, Republican Senator Susan Collins from Maine voted no. She was joined by Senator Lisa Murkowski from Alaska. The surprise “no” vote, though, came from Arizona Senator John McCain, who came back to the Senate this week after a diagnosis of brain cancer. The bill’s defeat dealt a blow to President Trump, as well as to Senator Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who spent the last 2 months trying to get the votes necessary to repeal and replace Obamacare. And Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer calling for Congress to come together to address Obamacare’s existing issues.

So what’s the future of health care in America? Is it the Senate’s final attempt to do away with Obamacare?

Guests:

Eliza Collins, Congressional reporter for USA Today; she tweets @elizacollins1

Noam Levey, national health care reporter at the Washington Bureau of the Los Angeles Times; he tweets @NoamLevey