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Should LA city contractors disclose whether they’re building the border wall?




 Volunteers look over the US-Mexico border fence to see how illegal border crossers may jump the fence before going on the nightly patrol by citizen volunteers searching for people crossing into the US illegally from Mexico near Campo, California in eastern San Diego County.
Volunteers look over the US-Mexico border fence to see how illegal border crossers may jump the fence before going on the nightly patrol by citizen volunteers searching for people crossing into the US illegally from Mexico near Campo, California in eastern San Diego County.
David McNew/Getty Images

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On Tuesday, the City Council voted 13-0 to request the city attorney to prepare an ordinance that would make Los Angeles city contractors disclose whether they have business ties to Trump’s border wall project.

Councilmember Gil Cedillo, who proposed the motion, condemned the border wall as racist and counter to the values of Los Angeles. He said the proposed rules would deter businesses from working on the project and also create transparency so he could vote against contracts with those businesses.

Opponents include the Associated General Contractors of America, who said this political litmus test would punish businesses and be damaging to workers. It might also create a slippery slope of discrimination against contractors that work on other politicized projects.

After the ordinance language is drafted, it will go back to the City Council for a vote.

Should LA City contractors reveal whether they have business ties to Trump’s border wall project? Is it fair for the city to create a political litmus test? Or is it a reflection of the city’s values?

Guests: 

Gil Cedillo, Los Angeles City Councilmember for District 1, which includes sections of Northeast Los Angeles and the greater Downtown area

Joseph Villela, policy director at the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights Los Angeles (CHIRLA)

Tom Holsman, CEO of the Associated General Contractors of California, an advocacy group for contractors