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The controversy over swapping Columbus Day with Indigenous Peoples Day




A 76-foot statue of explorer Christopher Columbus stands in Columbus circle on August 23, 2017 in New York City.
A 76-foot statue of explorer Christopher Columbus stands in Columbus circle on August 23, 2017 in New York City.
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

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Los Angeles City Council will vote Wednesday on whether to switch out Columbus Day to Indigenous Peoples Day.

As reported by City News Service, the move was proposed by Councilman Mitch O’Farrell in November of 2015. O’Farrell said that “recognizing the contributions, history, and sacrifices made by the original inhabitants of the Los Angeles area is long overdue.” He also highlighted the historical struggles of Native Americans including “enslavement and brutality” as reasons for the name change. Councilman Joe Buscaino, who is Italian-American, opposed O’Farrell’s motion calling it divisive. Buscaino said in October that he would support creating an Indigenous Peoples Day, but not at the expense of another culture. But observing a second holiday would cost the city $2 million in overtime.

What do you think of changing Columbus Day to Indigenous Peoples Day?

Guest:

Stephen Aron, history professor and department chair at UCLA whose research focuses on the American West and frontiers in North America