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Stakeholders weigh in on who pays for California’s multibillion-dollar water project




Trucks filled with agricultural products cross a bridge over the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. The so-called Bay Delta Conservation Plan has two
Trucks filled with agricultural products cross a bridge over the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. The so-called Bay Delta Conservation Plan has two "co-equal" goals that are at odds -- restoring the ecosystem while protecting water deliveries to Central Valley farms and Southern California’s growing population.
Mae Ryan/KPCC

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Gov. Jerry Brown plans to build two water tunnels to central and Southern California, the state’s biggest water projects in the coming decades.

The cost of the project has ballooned to $17 billion. According to the L.A. Times, who should fund the massive project has become a contentious issue among water districts across the state.

And then there’s the environmental question. Many water agencies in Southern California, the main beneficiaries, support the planned tunnels. Opponents fear the tunnels will pose a threat to species upstream and produce unintended environmental damage.

Host Larry Mantle checks in on the latest economic ramification and environmental impact of the water tunnels.

Guests:

Bettina Boxall, LA Times reporter covering water issues and the environment who’s been following the story

Jeff Kightlinger, general manager and chief executive officer for The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California; he tweets @8thGenCA

Cannon Michael, president of Bowles Farming Company, an 11,000-acre farm operation in the city of Los Banos in Central California; he tweets @agleader

Adam Scow, California director for Food and Water Watch, a Washington D.C.-based advocacy group focusing on government accountability on food, water and corporate overreach