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As Gen Z takes the baton, a look back at the good, bad and ugly of the millennial era




A visitor takes a selfie with her pug dog at a pop-up Pug Cafe in Brick Lane, east London on October 27, 2017.
A visitor takes a selfie with her pug dog at a pop-up Pug Cafe in Brick Lane, east London on October 27, 2017.
DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP/Getty Images

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The oldest Gen Z kids turn 18 this year, according to Pew Research Center, meaning millennials' days of relevance are numbered.  

As reported by Buzzfeed, marketing execs won’t be clamoring over the slightly older generation as they did in the past, but millennials made some great strides during their reign, reinventing work perks and navigating their way through post-recession employment.

The millennial legacy includes podcasts, selfies, and redefining creative careers. They’ve taken the blame for a lot (and pouted about it). Like a Comey memo, millennial actions have have been highly documented: they’ve apparently killed the cereal industry, shrugged off bar soap, turned up their noses at golf and put the American Dream in peril.

Being “the worst” is tiring, so they’re finally passing the baton of scrutinizing judgment to Gen Z -- but not without some guidance. Today, AirTalk looks back on the hits and misses of the millennial era, and wants to know: What advice do you have for Gen Z?

Guest:

Jean Twenge, psychology professor at San Diego State University focusing on the millennial generation; her books include “Generation Me: Why Today's Young Americans Are More Confident, Assertive, Entitled--and More Miserable Than Ever Before” (Free Press, 2006) and "iGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy--and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood" (Atria Books, 2017)