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'Weinsteining': Has the #MeToo hashtag gone too far?




Members of the National Organization for Women (NOW) hold a news conference and demonstration outside of Manhattan Criminal Court on October 13, 2017 in New York City.
Members of the National Organization for Women (NOW) hold a news conference and demonstration outside of Manhattan Criminal Court on October 13, 2017 in New York City.
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

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Since gaining traction as a result of sexual misconduct allegations against Harvey Weinstein, the #MeToo hashtag has garnered both praise and criticism.

A recent Los Angeles Times Op-Ed argues the latter. The piece is written by Cathy Young, a contributing editor at Reason, and she argues about the potential negative effects to come out of the Weinstein fallout, the #MeToo campaign, and the various rhetoric surrounding it. She suggests that there may be some conflation between questionable conduct and sexual assault or even rape.

Young doesn’t excuse sexual harassment in the workplace, and writes that boorish behavior should be discouraged, but she also questions whether every gross remark amounts to harassment, and whether someone should automatically lose his or her career or reputation as a result.

What are your thoughts? Is the #MeToo movement “Weinsteining” people who’s actions don’t rise to the level of sexual harassment? Or is #MeToo a long overdue vehicle for having victims voices heard?

Guests:

Amy Alkon, author of the science-based book, “Good Manners For Nice People Who Sometimes Say the F-Word” (St. Martin’s Griffin, 2014)

Alyssa Rosenberg, pop culture writer for The Washington Post’s opinion section; she authored the article, “The 6 worst things men have said about sexual harassment in just one month”