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Annual Pew political typology report details ever-growing divide between parties and among partisans




Presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump stands next to Sen. Bob Corker (R-TN) during a campaign event at the Duke Energy Center for the Performing Arts  on July 5, 2016 in Raleigh, North Carolina.
Presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump stands next to Sen. Bob Corker (R-TN) during a campaign event at the Duke Energy Center for the Performing Arts on July 5, 2016 in Raleigh, North Carolina.
Sara D. Davis/Getty Images

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On the basic spectrum of political ideology, people might identify themselves as liberal or conservative or libertarian, Republican or Democrat or Independent.

But as this year’s report from the Pew Research Center on political typology shows, the divisions between people within those categories are wide enough to identify eight separate categories of political ideology.

The survey, comprised of responses from more than 5,000 adults over the summer, categorizes respondents as follows, from most conservative to most liberal: Core Conservatives, Country First Conservatives, Market Skeptic Republicans, New Era Enterprisers, Devout and Diverse, Disaffected Democrats, Opportunity Democrats, and Solid Liberals.

So, where do you fall on Pew’s spectrum of political typology? Take the official quiz here and share your results in the comments below. Do you agree with them? Why or why not?

Guests:

Domenico Montanaro, politics editor at NPR; he tweets @DomenicoNPR

Mindy Romero, political sociologist at UC Davis and founder and director of the California Civic Engagement Project; she tweets @MindySRomero