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After criticism from Texas officials, a look at the Red Cross response to Hurricane Harvey




Volunteers get a briefing at the George Brown Convention Center that has been turned into a shelter run by the American Red Cross to house victims of the high water from Hurricane Harvey on August 28, 2017 in Houston, Texas.
Volunteers get a briefing at the George Brown Convention Center that has been turned into a shelter run by the American Red Cross to house victims of the high water from Hurricane Harvey on August 28, 2017 in Houston, Texas.
Erich Schlegel/Getty Images

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The Red Cross is under fire for its response to Hurricane Harvey last month.

As reported by USA Today, Texas officials including Gov. Greg Abbott are accusing the organization of a disorganized and slow response following last month’s hurricane in Houston and its surrounding areas.

But this is not the first time the Red Cross has been questioned because of how it directs its resources. ProPublica and NPR teamed up for an investigation of how the organization spends its funds.

The Red Cross is trying to manage its money and manpower to help with multiple natural disasters this year, including hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria and the California wildfires. So what can the organization do to curb the criticism and offer the best possible aid? Larry speaks to ProPublica’s Decca Muldowney to find out more.

The Red Cross' response to USA Today's report can be found here.

Guest:

Decca Muldowney, journalist who contributed to ProPublica’s report “Texas Official After Harvey: The ‘Red Cross Was Not There’;” ProPublica has investigated numerous instances problems at the Red Cross