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‘Under LA’ conference at USC dives into some of the least visible areas of Los Angeles




Workers put final touches to a support structure, as ‘Lola’, one of two massive Tunnel Boring Machines (TBM) creating tunnels for the Light Rail Eastside Extension, after it broke through from burrowing a 1.7-mile tunnel segment for the Metro Gold Line eastward on November 16, 2006 in Los Angeles, California.
Workers put final touches to a support structure, as ‘Lola’, one of two massive Tunnel Boring Machines (TBM) creating tunnels for the Light Rail Eastside Extension, after it broke through from burrowing a 1.7-mile tunnel segment for the Metro Gold Line eastward on November 16, 2006 in Los Angeles, California.
David McNew/Getty Images

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USC is hosting scientists, researchers, writers, artists and historians in a day of conversation on what lies beneath Los Angeles: earthquakes, tunnels, fossils and oil, and more.

Speakers and panels will cover LA’s underground science and ecosystem, the city’s subterranean infrastructure, local military history, and its edgy arts and culture.

The conference is called “Under L.A.: Subterranean Stories,” and it’s open to the public Saturday, 9am-4:30pm at USC’s Doheny Memorial Library.

Guests:

William Deverell, director of the Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West (ICW) and co-curator of the “Under LA” conference this Saturday, Nov. 11, at USC’s Doheny Memorial Library

Robert-Michael deGroot, staff scientist for the U.S. Geological Survey in Pasadena and a panelist at the “Under LA” conference

Emily Lindsey, assistant curator and excavation site director at the La Brea Tar Pits and Museum; a panelist at the “Under LA” conference

M.G. Lord, assistant professor of English at USC and a panelist at the “Under LA”  conference