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SCOTUS to decide on the future of sports betting




A punter holds his betting slip on 2017 Oaks Day at Flemington Racecourse on November 9, 2017 in Melbourne, Australia.
A punter holds his betting slip on 2017 Oaks Day at Flemington Racecourse on November 9, 2017 in Melbourne, Australia.
Michael Dodge/Getty Images

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On Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments in a case that could legalize professional sports betting across the country.

Under the 1992 Bradley Act, sports betting is only allowed in four states: Nevada, Delaware, Montana and Oregon. But a challenge brought forth by New Jersey could open up the field to new players in the $150 billion industry.

Gov. Chris Christie's original appeal to legalize sports betting in casinos and race tracks failed in 2016, and the state is now petitioning that the federal government is commandeering by failing to enforce its own prohibition while giving New Jersey no room to modify state laws. In response is the NCAA in support of upholding the single regulation against sports betting as a way to protect athletes from exploitation.

Larry speaks to two guests on opposing sides who were present at today's oral arguments.

Guests:

Michelle Minton, senior fellow of consumer policy at the Competitive Enterprise Institute, which has filed an amicus brief on behalf of the petitioners in the case; she was also in the courtroom today to hear the oral arguments

Daniel Wilf-Townsend, he’s an attorney at Gupta Wessler PLLC based in D.C.; he filed an amicus brief in today’s case on behalf of Stop Predatory Gambling and other organizations